Cape Town is submerged with the beauty of eternal silence and symphony. This wonderful city has emerged over the past two decades as a fascinating mix of African, European, and Malay influences, not only as one of the great capitals of the world but also as the vibrant, diverse, exhilarating heart of South Africa.

The visitors can get the most out of what locals call the Mother City by using any number of blogs, applications, and tours. But the trick is to treat this metropolis the way Capetonians do themselves: kick back on the beach, feast at one of several first-rate restaurants, knock back a glass of wine, and, above all, forget about Moenie worry nie.

Here’s our list of top things to do in Cape Town which you are absolutely going to love it. So, let’s get into our list:

1. Mountain Table

What’s it? In the name, the clue is. Your time is totally worth a trip to this famous landmark. You can go for a hike here. And trust me, no one would judge you if you go with the cable car here.

Why should you go? The views here are simply magnificent which will leave you in awe. When you’re up there, there’s also a short circular walking path you can take which is better and even more serene.

2. The Kirstenbosch

What’s it? It is about 1,300 acres of botanical gardens slope down through the leafy southern suburbs of Cape Town from Table Mountain. The Tree Canopy Walkway offers an elevated location suitable for bird-watching and clicking pictures (also known as ‘the Boomslang’ or tree snake). It is also popular for gardens. So, don’t miss the protea garden, dedicated to the national flower of South Africa.

Why should you go?In Cape Town’s city center, there are not many places to sit back and soak up some sunlight, and definitely none near this lush. If you want to catch a trail run, a craft market, or the Summer Sunset concert series then this the perfect place.

3. Zeitz Modern African Art Museum

What’s it?This the continent’s biggest exhibition of contemporary African art includes works from all over the diaspora. In transforming an abandoned grain silo into 80 galleries, London-based architect Thomas Heatherwick outdid himself.

Why should you go? The works talk on their own. Check out Cyrus Kabiru’s Afro-futurist goggles, Ghada Amer’s anti-patriarchal needlework, Kehinde Wiley’s oil portrait, and NandiphaMntambo’s cowhide sculptures.

4. Beach of Boulders

What’s it? A sandy stretch of shoreline with rugged outcrops and wild waves on the Cape Peninsula. Not so nice to lounge on or swim in, but it makes for a wonderful stroll along the coast. The primary attraction is the wild African penguin colony.

Why should you go? Aren’t you listening? The penguins are there. They’re waddling, they’re swimming, they’re squawking at each other, they smell a little funny. And they are in their hundreds here.

5. Isle of Robben

What’s it? Nelson Mandela, along with hundreds of other political prisoners, spent much of his 27-year term here in jail. It’s now a World Heritage Site for Unesco.

Why should you go? The museum of the Robben Island Prison is a place of major historical significance, if horrible. Just shy of 7km from the coast of Cape Town, on pre-booked tours, visitors are welcome. Former prisoners provide part of the tours, providing clear insight into what it really was like during the apartheid struggle.

6. The Neighbourgoods Market

What’s it? In the Biscuit Mill growth of Woodstock, now home to dozens of small companies, an achingly trendy and wildly successful Saturday food market. It’s peak gentrification, but the standard of what’s on offer isn’t overlooked.

Why should you go? At Neighbourgoods, the sheer range of influences on South Africa’s cuisine is seen. Expect to snack your way through all through new juices, coffee, and craft beer, from biltong to Black Forest gâteau.

7. The Kalk Bay

What’s it? This cute suburb has a colorful variety of shops along its seafront that mostly sell stuff you really don’t need, but want. Also, the café scene is fantastic, so it’s a relaxing place to spend an afternoon pottering about.

Why should you go? In that suitcase, you can certainly fit a few antiques or knick-knacks, so it’s worth checking out Kalk Bay Vintage. And make yourself like a local by getting Kalky’s fish and chips for tea.

8. The Norval Foundation

What’s it? An understated art gallery in a stunning setting deep in the southern suburbs featuring a private family collection.

Why should you go? Art lovers would enjoy the permanent and temporary exhibits that, by showcasing some of South Africa’s best-known artists, have so far set the bar high. Set underneath the mountains, the outdoor sculpture garden makes for a perfect aimless ramble.

9. Monkeybiz

What’s it? A non-profit shop set up by South African artists that provide traditional beadwork work for local people. From small worry dolls to life-sized porcupines, their bold designs are totally spectacular.

Why should you go? The beaded sculptures are often outlandish (if the zebras are rainbow-striped, don’t be surprised) and made with tremendous talent. Knowing that you’ve helped hundreds of women support their families and achieve some freedom, buy souvenirs to take home.

10. The Publik

What’s it? A trendy but rather open bar that stocks uncommon wines, often low-intervention, from an Aladdin’s cellar. The seasonal food menu of small plates makes it doubly difficult to leave.

Why should you go? The wines of the Western Cape are abundant, cheap and among the best in the world, so you would be a fool not to make the most of being so close to the vineyards. Publik is also a great place from which to explore the classically cool Tamboerskloof district.

11. Chinchilla Rooftop Bar

What’s it? The beach-centered suburb of Camps Bay is one of the richest in the world, and for a deservedly Spenny sundowner, the top pick.

Why should you go? If a bottle of Grey Goose for the table’ is your favorite tipple, then you’ll fit right in at Chinchilla, a rooftop bar with sandy, palm tree-speckled views on all sides. If it isn’t, this is the city’s most remarkable people-watching spot.

12. Street art Woodstock

What’s it? Some call itgentrification; others say it’s the most thrilling emerging art space in the capital. Anyway, this area is full of outstanding public works of art. It seems like on every block there is a mural.

Why should you go? The tough anti-graffiti laws in Cape Town mean that there is less public art than you would otherwise expect around the area. Come here to see at its most vivid the Capetonian landscape.

13. The Lion’s Head

What’s it? Hike, ride, or drive with 360-degree views of the City Bowl and the bay to the top of this peak.

Why should you go? Views, thoughts, opinions. The sunsets are phenomenal, and a favorite for locals as well as tourists. If you’re the kind whose favorite shop is Decathlon, consider adding the route up to Lion’s Head to your vacation plans as well.

14. Long Street Area

What’s it? A classic way of spending an afternoon in Cape Town is to browse the dinky cafés, boutiques, and antique shops on Long Street. In a way that makes it a perfect introduction to the city as it is right now, the row of elegant Victorian buildings mixes traditional African crafts, spiritual trinkets, and trendy bars.

Why should you go? After browsing the treasures available along with the Long Street Antique Arcade, the vintage clothes at Mungo and Jemima, and the coffee from Rcaffe, souvenirs are not everything you’ll fill your suitcase with.

What’s Next?

Cape Town is one of the most sought after tourist attractions in South Africa. And it is just breath-taking when you visit it. You can explore this incredible city in any season as it has got the most beautiful sights and sceneries. From aesthetic islands to mountains to beaches it got everything in just one city. Which we highlighted and mentioned in the above text and it will help you explore the town better.

So next time when you plan for vacation how about you make The Cape Town an experience of your travel journal?

About Author: Suprava Sabat

A management student with a passion for writing and traveling. Suprava also loves cooking, painting and playing ukulele. She started writing short stories when she was just 10 years old as a hobby. She started writing professionally as a freelance content writer at the age of 18 and started doing internships at the age of 19. She wishes to achieve all the goals in her life and wants to become a travel blogger.